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The mediating effects of college student's internalized shame and unconditional self-acceptance in the influence of socially prescribed perfectionism on interpersonal competence
Journal of the Korean Data & Information Science Society 2019;30:1350-73
Published online November 30, 2019;  https://doi.org/10.7465/jkdi.2019.30.6.1351
© 2019 Korean Data and Information Science Society.

Hee Jung Yu1

1Department of Social Welfare & Counseling, Catholic University of Pusan
Correspondence to: Associate professor, Department of Social Welfare & Counseling, Catholic University of Pusan, 57, Oryundae-ro, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 46242, Korea. E-mail: hjyu@cup.ac.kr

This research is supported by the 2017 Catholic University of Pusan reseach fund.
Received October 31, 2019; Revised November 15, 2019; Accepted November 15, 2019.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Evaluating the mediating effects of internalized shame and unconditional selfacceptance in the influence of socially prescribed perfectionism on interpersonal competence is the purpose of this research. A survey was conducted on 667 college students from five schools in B city. I analyzed and interpreted the results, using the structural equation modeling. The results showed that a fully mediated, competing model was more appropriate than a partially mediated, research model. The competitive model showed the following results. First, socially prescribed perfectionism does not affect interpersonal competence directly. Second, socially prescribed perfectionism affects interpersonal competence by mediating internalized shame. Third, socially prescribed perfectionism also affects interpersonal competence by mediating unconditional selfacceptance. Fourth, socially prescribed perfectionism affects interpersonal competence by mediating internalized shame and unconditional self-acceptance in order. Lastly, in the case of specific influence, socially prescribed perfectionism, internalized shame and unconditional self-acceptance explain 42.2% of interpersonal competence. I discussed the significance and the limitation of this study with the suggestions for the future investigations.
Keywords : College Student, internalized shame, interpersonal competence, mediating effect, socially prescribed perfectionism, unconditional self-acceptance.